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Sep 27 2013

Out of the blue, Humax announced the launch of their new single tuner Freesat HD box, with <free time> built-in. This took the industry by surprise hence why there are no reviews out there (at time of publishing), but behold; now there is!

Of late, Freesat has been stifled by a apparent lack of products available for the free satellite television platform, and this is no more obvious than in the single tuner HD box market, where there are just a small number of options, only one of which we see as worthy of the Freesat logo.

That was until now, as Humax has most certainly set the bar at a new height, launching a single tuner Freesat HD receiver based on the latest generation, known as <free time>. The <free time> service in brief adds to the basic access of 180+ television and radio channels via satellite with easy access to on-demand services via broadband from BBC iPlayer, ITV Player, 4oD and Demand 5, plus a number of interactive services, including YouTube; all seamlessly linked in to the EPG (electronic programme guide).

I have to admit I was concerned that the Humax single tuner wouldn’t have the processing power to cope with this new format and the fancy structure and graphics, but I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how capable it is, and actually seems as fast to navigate as the older brother, the PVR based Humax HDR-1000S. Clearly Humax have invested heavily in a quality chipset capable of the job. It isn’t perfect though, the graphics do sometimes judder when floating in and out and can at times take a few seconds to load the full guide, with further slow down during recording, but for the most part, it handles it all very well.

Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver
Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver (contents)

From the moment you receive the Humax HB-1000S, with the bright packaging signifying the colours of the freesat logo, to opening up and getting started, you will see what a quality product this is, and more so, be surprised by just how small the receiver itself is (200mm x 38mm x 155mm), yet how sturdy it feels with some weight to it (0.5kg) comparable to the size. The unit matt black and has plenty of vent holes to aid in air-flow keeping the unit cool, helped by the inclusion of an external PSU (on the plug, not a separate brick). We are greatly relieved that Humax have decided to go down the route of an external power supply following the issue of blown capacitors on the previous FOXSAT-HD unit; at least now if there are any issues with power, the whole unit doesn’t need replacing. The power consumption in use is a maximum of 13W and 0.5W in standby. The front is simple in design, just a green LED light when on and red when off; and a power button.

The Humax also comes with a good range of accessories, including the remote (almost identical to the HDR-1000S version), 2 x AAA batteries, HDMI cable and Ethernet cable (1.5 metre each), User manual and warranty card. This should be enough to get you started and the included Quick installation guide is simple to follow.

Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver
Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver (front)

The back of the HB-1000S includes the usual connections you’d expect, but most obvious is the missing scart output, which has finally been resigned to the scrap heap on this ‘HD’ receiver (obviously the lack of scart means a much smaller design). What you do get though is a HDMI port, single satellite input, CVBS (RCA out), Optical S/PDIF out, 2 x USB 2.0 sockets (both on rear) and Ethernet 100BaseT . It is worth noting that this receiver doesn’t have wifi built-in which is a shame, but an external Humax USB dongle can be purchased.

Setting up is simple, painless, and very quick. Simply plug everything in, switch on and you’ll be greeted by the familiar Freesat installation screen. The signal from your satellite dish will be verified, you will be asked to enter your UK postcode, check the picture settings (usually automatic so not much to change here) and scan for the available channels, which is almost instant. The installation will also check for an Ethernet connection and then you are done! There is also the option to set a PIN number for parental control, but you can skip this stage if you wish.

Once in, you’ll be greeted with BBC One on channel 101 and the 180+ channels available at the moment. The remote, which is laid out similar to the HDR-1000S is easy to use and comfortable to hold, allowing you to select and individual channel with the number buttons or scan through them all using the cursors. The only real downside and it is personal preference but I’ve never been a fan of gloss black and the constant battle with fingerprints and scratch marks. Also, it still has the possible issue of someone accidentally pressing the TV button at the top and it no longer controlling the receiver; an issue often complained about on the previous FOXSAT-HDR. The main buttons are all centralised on the remote though, which includes the arrow cursors and <free time> button which accesses the menu structure which contains pretty much everything.

Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver
Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver (rear connections)

The picture and sound quality on both standard and high-definition channels is very good, with the optical output a good option for Dolby Digital on programmes where available. These receivers are getting to a point now where the quality is as good as being broadcast, so in comparison, is very similar to its rivals.

I won’t go into too much detail on navigating the menus, as it uses the same <free time> structure of the HDR-1000S and there are plenty of videos out there showing how it works, but in brief, you can access the TV Guide (with forward/backwards 7 day listings), the on-demand services, the options menu, a Humax portal for additional non-freesat features, the Freesat showcase highlighting the key programmes that day (which is fairly accurate based on general viewing tastes) and a few more standardised options to help you. The quick banner found at the bottom on any channel by pressing the OK button is very useful, and switches from now/next to further into the future with the right arrow button. One thing I’ve not found which is a glaring omission (again!) if it isn’t, but there appears to be no ability to sort channels by those in high-definition only; this is a feature many have requested, so a shame if it isn’t possible?

A key feature of this HB-1000S, and one that hasn’t been seen in a single tuner Freesat receiver since the TechniSat HDFS, is the ability to record to an external hard drive (as this isn’t a PVR, so no hard drive built-in). There is of course the limitation of only being able to record the channel you are on, but for the casual viewer who might just want to record every now and again, it is ideal. It is disappointing that you cannot use a USB stick (apart from playback of a few basic formats), but providing you have a USB hard drive larger than 60GB (allowing 40GB for the Humax structure so we’d recommend a much higher capacity), then this is a cost efficient way of PVR functionality without paying double for the HDR-1000S, however, if you don’t have such a device, then the prices do become fairly similar totted up. (edited) It is worth noting that due to broadcasting copyright restrictions, for recording purposes, the USB HDD must be assigned to the receiver. The format used is NTFS, though if you try using a FAT32 or EXT3 HDD, you will need to reformat to NTFS in the settings option first and then re-install the HDD.

Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver
Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Freetime Receiver (remote)

A key feature of this product that sets it apart from the existing range of Freesat HD receivers is defiantly the <free time> feature, and it works very well indeed now that you can receive all the main on-demand services. If you wish to watch a programme from the last 7 days, you can simply roll-back the EPG (TV guide) and click on the programme you want to watch, at which point you will be forwarded to the on-demand service via your broadband connection. On the whole, the service worked very well with the programmes usually available within 10-15 seconds, which on my terrible broadband connection was pretty good; it might be better on a faster line. I did experience a few problems opening programmes directly with Demand 5, but they were fine when selecting the Demand 5 home option first, so maybe that was down to my connection, or a bug that Humax will need to fix. I’m not a fan of on-demand services really, as I don’t like not being able to bypass adverts, but it’s a great inclusion following the trend and works well via direct links on the TV guide.

For those of you wanting more than the 180+ channels offered, there is a ‘non-freesat’ mode which allows you to scan for all channels available FTA (free-to-air) on the Astra2 and Eurobird1 satellites (the alignment your satellite dish has for Freesat). This option is basic, as it isn’t a fundamental part of Freesat (they want broadcasters to pay to put their channels on the official TV guide) but Humax have missed a trick which the rival at Manhattan hasn’t, whereby you can create your own line-up of channels (albeit without 7 day listings) and then access by a touch of a button from the normal Freesat mode.

Outside of the standardised platform is the Humax Portal, which includes a number of extra interactive services including Flickr and Wiki TV. Also within here is the new network client allowing you to connect to your home network/server to play back certain file types, which include but not limited to MPEG2, JPEG, BMP, GIF and PNG. I accessed a few AVI files through my NAS using a DNLA client and it worked very well, though obviously struggled with more complex file formats such as MKV, but that is to be expected. Once again, a great added feature and very handy.

Conclusion

For a unit so small, it is incredible what it is capable of, handling both the standard Freesat stuff and <free time> with relative ease. The receiver feels solidly built; looks smart and the remote is easy to use, though quite large compared to the box itself. The set up is easy and the supplied guides very handy for anyone less familiar with these products than I am. Once familiar, the menu structure is easy to navigate and TV guide looks and works very well. The option of accessing programmes already televised via the on-demand services directly is brilliant, even with the slight delay, and recording via USB hard drive is certainly a coup no other current Freesat receiver offers; ideal for casual viewers that wish to record programmes every now and again without the requirement for a fully operational PVR receiver (Freesat+HD). There are a few minor issues, such as some delays navigating the menus, and no ability to record to a USB stick, plus a reliance on accessing the on-demand services via a wired connection, unless willing to folk out for the optional wifi dongle. On the whole however, the Humax HB-1000S is in a class of its own within the single tuner market. At an RRP of under £100, this fits nicely between a basic Freesat receiver and a fully equipped recorder; and with access to all the main on-demand broadcast services (plus your home network), makes for a handy multimedia box too.
Humax have moved the game on, and the HB-1000S is worthy of top marks.

Joinfreesat score 9.5 out of 10
Review: Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Receiver

Suggestions to Humax
Flexibility with USB storage devices and formatting
Wifi built-in or a faster wifi dongle available
HD category within TV guide
Improved non-freesat mode to set your own list
More unique model name to avoid confusion by consumers

Rumours
It is rumoured that eventually you will be able to connect this box to a HDR-1000S and access its recordings, using the main HDR-1000S as a hub for the ultimate multi-room experience. We hope this happens but will cover this in a separate review at the time.

Where to buy

The Humax HB-1000S is available now. Please consider purchasing from our key site sponsor, the UK’s leading satellite retailer, Satbuyer for £99.95 + delivery. Alternative places to buy can be found on the Humax HB-1000S product page.

61 Responses to “Review: Humax HB-1000S Freesat HD Receiver”

  1. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    Interesting review and well done for being the first!
    Presumably this machine has to format the external hard drive in order to be able to record, as with the HD Fox T2, and the format used is Ext3. This being the case, there would not be a 4GB limitation on file size.
    It would be be interesting to know if the recorded video files could be accessed and played on other machines, as they can on other Humax models? I appreciate that you’d have to use something other than a PC in order to read the disk.
    I’d also be interested to know how the HB 1000S talks to a HDR 1000S in order to access stored programs on the latter. Is this a straightforward plug and play capability, or does the HDR 1000S need a software update in order to share its program material?

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  2. admin Says:

    Lawrence Pearce said:
    Interesting review and well done for being the first!
    Presumably this machine has to format the external hard drive in order to be able to record, as with the HD Fox T2, and the format used is Ext3. This being the case, there would not be a 4GB limitation on file size.
    It would be be interesting to know if the recorded video files could be accessed and played on other machines, as they can on other Humax models? I appreciate that you’d have to use something other than a PC in order to read the disk.
    I’d also be interested to know how the HB 1000Stalks to a HDR 1000S in order to access stored programs on the latter. Is this a straightforward plug and play capability, or does the HDR 1000Sneed a software update in order to share its program material?

    From what I understand, you can’t play recorded files on any other device, though suspect there will be a work-around for this.

    Accessing the HDR-1000S hard drive isn’t available yet, so not sure how it will be implemented; no doubt a software update will be involved.

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  3. miffo Says:

    Youtube is completely broken on both this and the HDR. Humax apparently aware of it.
    I have used showcase a few times, but hope that Humax set the default channels as HD. It is possible to work around, by looking at ‘showing again’ so it’s not that much of a problem.

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  4. Terry Says:

    I was surprised that any plugged in USB drive requires 40GB for “the Humax structure”. I figure part of this includes the rolling buffer for pausing live TV. All the same – quite a chunk considering the device can operate without a HDD.

    A good review, but I would take issue with one thing:

    “I accessed a few AVI files through my NAS using a DNLA client and it worked very well, though obviously struggled with more complex file formats such as MKV, but that is to be expected.”

    Not in this day and age! I have an 2 year old Sony Bluray player that can do MKVs perfectly well – and Sony are not know for their largesse when it comes to supporting playback formats. Any cheap Chinese media player available for the last three or four years will play MKVs. I’ve seen Philips BR players, Samsung TVs with compatibility. So … nope!

    It’s NOT a complex format. It is most certainly NOT to be expected. Not in 2013.

    (otherwise, a fine review) :)

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  5. admin Says:

    Terry, I know what you mean, but a satellite receiver still has quite a separation from a media player, so not all formats are supported. MKV is in theory a layer rather than a format and is made up of so many different codec that I’m not surprised some weren’t accepted in testing; but having said that, you mention Sony and some of their devices, including the very latest W9 television I have still doesn’t support many of them. Bare in mind that Humax clearly wanted to hit a target price point, and all these different file formats cost money in licensing rights, for only a few customers to actually use.

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  6. Richard Crichton Says:

    Been a Freetime sceptic but have finally taken the plunge and ordered this box from Satbuyer.I have a 320gb Bufallo USB HD which will be ideal to partner with this box.

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  7. Neil Says:

    Great review admin, been away so only just had chance to read it properly. I might end up with a couple of these once I buy my new property.

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  8. admin Says:

    Neil said:
    Great review admin, been away so only just had chance to read it properly. I might end up with a couple of these once I buy my new property.

    Give me a shout when you do consider buying ;)

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  9. Al (Original) Says:

    I must admit this box has left me slightly puzzled as to where it fits in the range.

    Is this a replacement for the Foxsat HD? I see the Foxsat still on sale for the same price as this box but its hard to see anyone buying the Foxsat now if this has the same features and more for the same price.

    One thing I do find disappointing though is your reported slight slow down during some functions. Why do manufacturers keep building to the lowest possible hardware spec? I’m sure a more powerful processor would have only added another £1 or £2 to the cost of the box and I’m sure most people would have still bought it. So why cripple functionality for the sake of a couple of pounds?

    When people are considering a box for more than £100 they’re looking for quality foremost and even if it was say £5 extra, I’m sure most people who would pay say £120 would pay £125 if they were getting a box that was the fastest and most slick box on the market.

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  10. admin Says:

    Al (Original) said:
    I must admit this box has left me slightly puzzled as to where it fits in the range.
    Is this a replacement for the Foxsat HD? I see the Foxsat still on sale for the same price as this box but its hard to see anyone buying the Foxsat now if this has the same features and more for the same price.
    One thing I do find disappointing though is your reported slight slow down during some functions. Why do manufacturers keep building to the lowest possible hardware spec? I’m sure a more powerful processor would have only added another £1 or £2 to the cost of the box and I’m sure most people would have still bought it. So why cripple functionality for the sake of a couple of pounds?
    When people are considering a box for more than £100 they’re looking for quality foremost and even if it was say £5 extra, I’m sure most people who would pay say £120 would pay £125 if they were getting a box that was the fastest and most slick box on the market.

    It does suffer a little from the screen jerking in and out when accessing menus, and a little slow to react, however, this does greatly improve the more you use the box, as no doubt more information is cached. Would agree that an improved chipset might help a little, but the HDR-1000S also suffers similarly.

    This box still falls into the high-end range of the single tuner Freesat receivers and has its place. Early sales suggest a very strong launch and that should pick up more so as more reviews are published, if of course others agree with my feelings on the box.

    The FOXSAT-HD was discontinued back in around April time, so a few may still be clearing stock.

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  11. Al (Original) Says:

    Ok thanks Ian. I suspected it was a replacement for the Foxsat as it didn’t make sense otherwise but with them still being advertised on here it appeared as though maybe it was an additional option to the range.

    It is a pity about the chipset although good to hear it gets faster as cached.

    I just wish premium manufacturers would ensure they have a truly quick chipset rather than a slightly cheaper option that allegedly slows at some points.

    Cost cuttings that affect performance or reliability never makes sense to me. A customer with a fast reliable £125 or £130 box is a far happier customer than one with a slower or less reliable £120 box, and happy customers = repeat sales plus recommendations.

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  12. Kevin Says:

    So would you recommend this box above the Manhattan HD-S2? Because I was gonna replace my existing Foxsat HD. Plus I hope Humax have learned from the Foxsat HD that CHEAP capacitors will not win many fans…

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  13. admin Says:

    Kevin said:
    So would you recommend this box above the Manhattan HD-S2? Because I was gonna replace my existing Foxsat HD. Plus I hope Humax have learned from the Foxsat HD that CHEAP capacitors will not win many fans…

    Yes absolutely, if you are willing to pay this price, then it is the best single tuner Freesat receiver we’ve tested. Humax now use a power adaptor within the UK plug, so hopefully no more issues with cheap capacitors.

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  14. Kevin Says:

    admin said: Yes absolutely, if you are willing to pay this price, then it is the best single tuner Freesat receiver we’ve tested. Humax now use a power adaptor within the UK plug, so hopefully no more issues with cheap capacitors.

    Thanks – I dont the price I just wanted the better box…its for my Dad and dont want anything too complicated so wont be using catch up or online stuff..Thanks again admin

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  15. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    No more issues with cheap capacitors?
    Well I hope so, but I’m not sure that a separate, sealed power supply is the answer. They have no air circulation for cooling, they can never be replaced – and what will be the replacement cost of a new power supply in three or four years time. Will it even be available as a separate part?
    Most consumer equipment these days seems to rely on cheaply sourced and marginally rated electrolytics to contain costs, it just seems to be a fact of life.
    Incidentally I have repaired several Foxsat HDs recently. It’s a comparatively simple task if you have a soldering iron – but if not, the whole power supply can simply be swapped by undoing a few screws.

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  16. Kevin Says:

    Hi again,
    I was just wondering does the new Humax have a LED channel display on the front like the Foxsat HD, as this box is for my elderly Father?
    Thanks in advance.

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  17. admin Says:

    Kevin said:
    Hi again,I was just wondering does the new Humax have a LED channel display on the front like the Foxsat HD, as this box is for my elderly Father? Thanks in advance.

    No, no display on the front, just a green/red LED to indicate on/off

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  18. Pollensa1946 Says:

    “It is worth noting that due to broadcasting copyright restrictions, the USB hard drive will need to be formatted by the receiver to either FAT32 or EXT3″

    On the MyHumax forum it is claimed that the above statement is not true. The box apparently formats to NTFS, or if already NTFS does nothing.

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  19. admin Says:

    Pollensa1946 said:
    “It is worth noting that due to broadcasting copyright restrictions, the USB hard drive will need to be formatted by the receiver to either FAT32 or EXT3″
    On the MyHumax forum it is claimed that the above statement is not true.The box apparently formats to NTFS, or if already NTFS does nothing.

    Interesting to know, if I get chance, I’ll try that. I know when I connected my USB HDD which was formatted already to NTFS it wouldn’t work and wouldn’t re-format, yet was fine when I changed it to FAT32 first via my PC.

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  20. Pollensa1946 Says:

    As a potential purchaser of 3 of these HBs, the problem I have is that everything I read about the box tells me we have another HDR1000S clone here. Nobody knows what the box does or how it does it, the user guide is crap, claimed features don’t in fact hold up to scrutiny. My experience as an early adopter of the HDR is now to hold off for at least a year while Humax fix the problems.

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  21. Richard Crichton Says:

    Lawrence Pearce said:
    No more issues with cheap capacitors?
    Well I hope so, but I’m not sure that a separate, sealed power supply is the answer. They have no air circulation for cooling, they can never be replaced – andwhat will be the replacement cost of a new power supply in three or four years time. Will it even be available as a separate part?
    Most consumer equipment these days seems to rely on cheaply sourced and marginally rated electrolytics to contain costs, it just seems to be a fact of life.
    Incidentally I have repaired several Foxsat HDs recently. It’s a comparatively simple task if you have a soldering iron – but if not, the whole power supply can simply be swapped by undoing a few screws.

    Any suitable12v regulated power supply with a 2.1mm tip can be used if the origional plug packs up on my Manhattan HD-S. It dosen’t need to be OEM. There are plenty available on auction sites starting a £10. BTW The plug dosen’t need ventilation slots as it stays cool although the box gets slightly warm. Much easier that having to source and solder in capacitors etc imho.

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  22. admin Says:

    Richard Crichton said: Any suitable12v regulated power supply with a 2.1mm tip can be used if the origional plug packs up on my Manhattan HD-S. Itdosen’t need to be OEM. There are plenty available on auction sites starting a £10. BTW The plug dosen’t need ventilation slots as it stays cool although the box gets slightly warm. Much easier that having to source and solder in capacitors etc imho.

    He’s referring to the Humax HB-1000S but the same theory should apply.

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  23. Richard Crichton Says:

    Pollensa1946 said:
    As a potential purchaser of 3 of these HBs, the problem I have is that everything I read about the box tells me we have another HDR1000S clone here.Nobody knows what the box does or how it does it, the user guide is crap, claimed features don’t in fact hold up to scrutiny.My experience as an early adopter of the HDR is now to hold off for at least a year while Humax fix the problems.

    But the HDR1000S has already been out for a year so if this is a clone the problems should already have been sorted out. What cllaimed features don’t hold up to scrutiny? Rarely read user giudes so not really bothered if its poor.

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  24. Pollensa1946 Says:

    Richard Crichton said: But the HDR1000S has already been out for a year so if this is a clone the problems should already have been sorted out. What cllaimed features don’t hold up to scrutiny? Rarely read user giudes so not really bothered if its poor.

    Problems sorted on the HDR1000S? You need to read a lot more of the various forums, you would find a mass of annoying problems reported there.

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  25. Pollensa1946 Says:

    Richard Crichton said: … What claimed features don’t hold up to scrutiny? …

    1) Media Player claimed to be DLNA certified. Fails to handle a large music collection that other players handle with ease. Fails to play some MP3s. Fails to display some JPEGs. Fails to play any of my AVI files.
    2) Planned client/server (HB/HDR) interface. No server yet available on the HDR. As to expected quality of server? See (1) above.
    3) Favourites facility is useless, requires 4 key presses to display.
    4) Lots of unexpected glitches in the GUI, which usually require an enquiry on one of the forums to get an answer (crap User Guide).
    …I could go on.

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  26. admin Says:

    Following clarification with Humax (I hope they have it right), the following has been edited:

    It is worth noting that due to broadcasting copyright restrictions, the USB hard drive will need to be formatted by the receiver to either FAT32 or EXT3 and therefore cannot be used with other devices, plus FAT32 has a limit of 4GB for an individual file, so don’t expect to record anything in HD of long duration.

    To…

    It is worth noting that due to broadcasting copyright restrictions, for recording purposes, the USB HDD must be assigned to the receiver. The format used is NTFS, though if you try using a FAT32 or EXT3 HDD, you will need to reformat to NTFS in the settings option first and then re-install the HDD.

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  27. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    It’s good that Humax have used the NTFS format so avoiding any 4GB file size restriction, though it sounds like recordings and media files cannot coexist on the same hard drive, which is a bit of a pain.
    Regarding alternative power supplies for the these new Humax boxes, it looks like the company has used an unusual power socket in order to prevent users plugging in an unsuitable power unit which could cause damage. Bear in mind that the HB 1000S requires 2A (and the HDR 1000S, 4A) and it’s obvious that not any old 12V supply will do.

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  28. Richard Crichton Says:

    Good news. Can confirm that recordings and media files can coexist on a NTFS hard drive and the media files still play on a computer (but not the recordings). Plays xvid avi, mpg mp4 avi mp3 jpeg . Also can play files on a FAT32 pen drive (but can’t record).
    Problem. Put in my post code ( Scotland) but box thinks I’m in England G2.
    Getting BBC1 London and ITV instead of STV. Help!

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  29. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    Out of interest have you tried playing standard definition recordings on a computer with VLC media player? I know that this will play SD recordings made on the Foxsat HDR but not HD ones.

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  30. Richard Crichton Says:

    Lawrence Pearce said:
    Out of interest have you tried playing standard definition recordings on a computer with VLC media player? I know that this will play SD recordings made on the Foxsat HDR but not HD ones.

    No not yet. Only got the box today and I cannot get my local channels. I’m wondering if its because of the transponder move to the new satellite.
    Getting ITV Central instead of STV on 113. Not getting BBC1 Scotland or BBC 2 Scotland.

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  31. Richard Crichton Says:

    Correction not getting BBC1 HD Scotland or BBC 2 HD Scotland. Managed to put the SD ones on 101 and 102 using customisable channels.

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  32. Richard Crichton Says:

    Richard Crichton said:
    Correction not getting BBC1 HD Scotland or BBC 2 HD Scotland. Managed to put the SD ones on 101 and 102 using customisable channels.

    The correct channels appeared at around 8.45 last night. It appears the box already had a set of channels stored in it for the Central ITV region and it took a while to download the correct channel info for Scotland.
    While it is great having BBC1HD Scotland back I have lost ITV on demand as it seems that STV do not provide a Freetime player which is crazy as they do for YouView. Lets hope that when the rumoured April EPG joining date for STV HD hsppens they will also provide an on demand service to Freesat. Other snags with the Humax are that the whole case is slightly twisted and the box will not sit level on a flat surface, it rocks. This is rather disappointing for a Humax which is supposed to be a premium product. A front mounted USB port would also be prefered for pen drives but that is a minor niggle. BTW there is no BBC2HD Scotland (yet) my mistake.

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  33. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    @32
    Regarding the “twisted” case, I experienced this with another Humax product, a PVR9300T. The solution was to loosen (but not remove) all the screws securing the top cover, then retighten them with the box standing on a level surface. I can’t guarantee this will work with the HB 1000S, but it’s worth a try!
    There’s one other thing I’m puzzled about and that is the power consumption of this box. The test here quotes 13 watts in use, while the rear socket is labelled 12V /2.5A, which equates to 30 watts. It would be nice to think Humax have used a generously rated PSU to benefit long term reliability, but I’m not so sure.

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  34. Richard Crichton Says:

    @33
    I might try that, thanks for the tip. The plug says input 0.9A output 12v 2A . It also has an internal fuse and lightning protection according to the specs.
    The DLNA client works ok with Samsung AllShare on my netbook. Playing xvid video files no problem.

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  35. Richard Crichton Says:

    Recorded Atlantis from BBC1 HD and it made two files a 20min and a 25 min one even though the hard drive is NTFS formatted. :(

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  36. Dave Matthews Says:

    Impressed with he reviews, I see Which has given this new model an optimistic
    review – though obviously it is still early days! I plan to buy one, from J Lewis, which has a 2 yr warranty, for use in Greece. I understand I have to enter a UK postal code, the question is do I enter it here in the UK or, when I set it up in Corfu ?
    Thanks for help – Dave

      Quote

  37. Pollensa1946 Says:

    Dave Matthews said:
    … I understand I have to enter a UK postal code, the question is do I enter it here in the UK or, when I set it up in Corfu ?
    Thanks for help–Dave

    Enter it when you set up, location is immaterial, anywhere will be effective..

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  38. Lawrence Pearce Says:

    Dave Matthews said: I understand I have to enter a UK postal code, the question is do I enter it here in the UK or, when I set it up in Corfu ?

    I think a more significant issue is whether you will get sufficient signal strength of the Freesat channels in Corfu.
    With more and more channels shifting to the UK focused Astra 1N satellite, you may find that reception of the main Freesat channels is impossible, or requires an extraordinarily large dish. I would be inclined to check this out with neighbours etc before buying expensive equipment. You can determine which channels are broadcast from 1N via the Lyngsat website.

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  39. Pollensa1946 Says:

    Lawrence Pearce said: I think a more significant issue is whether you will get sufficient signal strength of the Freesat channels in Corfu.

    Yes, all of the satellite footprint info I have seen suggests that Corfu will be right on the outer edge of the signal area. I would definitely check within the local area for experiences.

      Quote

  40. Dave Matthews Says:

    Thankyou both for your helpful replies. As you rightly point out the satellite
    footprint is critical – I’ll take your advice and check out the signal strength when I
    go to Corfu next month. Thanks again – Dave Matthews

      Quote

  41. Richard Says:

    Lawrence Pearce said: I think a more significant issue is whether you will get sufficient signal strength of the Freesat channels in Corfu.
    With more and more channels shifting to the UK focused Astra 1N satellite, you may find that reception of the main Freesat channels is impossible, or requires an extraordinarily large dish. I would be inclined to check this out with neighbours etc before buying expensive equipment. You can determine which channels are broadcast from 1N via the Lyngsat website.

    When Astra 2E becomes operational, Astra 1N is expected to be moved to its design location of 19.2°E and all remaining channels currently broadcasting from Astra 1N moved to Astra 2E

      Quote

  42. Phil Says:

    Hey just got the HB-1000s and was wondering does it have a back button or feature that takes you back to your previous channel you were watching? so you dont need to keep going to the guide..

    Thanks

      Quote

  43. Pollensa1946 Says:

    I think the R/C is essentially the same as the HDR, so the answer is no it does not. You can of course simply enter the channel number without going to the guide (if you can remember it that is, most times I never can). Just one of these many little quirks you have to live with when using the Humax.

      Quote

  44. phil Says:

    Ok thank you, too used to using it :) upgraded from technisat hdfs

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  45. Richard Says:

    Agree pity no back button for channels like Technisat and Manhattan boxes also find it crashes and reboots every couple of days seemingly at random while watching tv channels.
    Youtube has no way of getting back to it’s own menu from the vids. Pressing the back button on the remote takes you out of the app altogether. Very poor show.

      Quote

  46. Richard Says:

    Richard said:
    Agree pity no back button for channels like Technisat and Manhattan boxes also find it crashes and reboots every couple of days seemingly at random while watching tv channels.
    Youtube has no way of getting back to it’s own menu from the vids. Pressing the back button on the remote takes you out of the app altogether. Very poor show.

    You have to press the stop button now apparently. Thanks for telling us.

      Quote

  47. Richard Says:

    Box crashes, today after only 17 minutes. Going to have to send it back.

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  48. Mohaned wageeh Says:

    hello

    i have a problem i have recorded yesterday from my humax on my external Harddisk and already NTFS portion

    what i facing now that i can’t play the recorded videos on my computer
    i can’t see it on my harddisk when i connect to my laptop ” folder size 0 ”
    but when i connect it to humax i can play it

      Quote

  49. admin Says:

    Mohaned wageeh said:
    hello
    i have a problem i have recorded yesterday from my humax on my external Harddisk and already NTFS portion
    what i facing now that i can’t play the recorded videos on my computer
    i can’t see it on my harddisk when i connect to my laptop ” folder size 0 ”
    but when i connect it to humax i can play it

    That is likely because the hard drive is assigned to the Humax to protect against broadcasting infringements, so will only playback on the Humax.

      Quote

  50. Martin Says:

    Just purchased this box today very happy with it and what it can do. You Tube works perfectly as do all the on demand channels although picture quality drops considerably when using them apart from i player as you can toggle HD. All HD channels are very good, the remote is great, so is the epg and extremely happy for the price.

      Quote

  51. Richard Says:

    Richard said:
    Box crashes, today after only 17 minutes. Going to have to send it back.

    Replacement box works perfectly. Super little thing.
    Good service from Satbuyer.

      Quote

  52. rotekz Says:

    I can’t get this unit to recognise my external 3tb hard drive. It is a Samsung D3 and connects with a usb 3 lead that I believe is also backwards compatible to usb 2. The HB-1000S does not see a drive connected and there are no options in the Storage settings to format or do anything.

    The drive came formatted as ntfs. I have tried to reformat to ntfs and exFAT on my pc but still the Humax does not recognise it.

      Quote

  53. Richard Says:

    Nice being able to play my videos, music and pictures from my windows 7 netbook using the file share thingy. Great little box for the money.

      Quote

  54. megan Says:

    does it have to be connected to router for it to work

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  55. Brian Says:

    Hi, can the HB 1000 version now access and play recordings from the HDR 1000 located elsewhere on the network?

      Quote

  56. admin Says:

    Brian said:
    Hi, can the HB 1000 version now access and play recordings from the HDR 1000 located elsewhere on the network?

    No, not yet. No indication of timescale either.

      Quote

  57. John Says:

    Hi, I’m having trouble adjusting the picture format on Freesat chanel 401 (Racing Post live greyhound racing, the main reason for purchasing this box) & a few others, the picture is compressed making everything appear tall & thin. I find it unbearable to watch a distorted picture. Phoned Humax helpline they said try reducing the 1080 down to 720, did’nt work! The older Humax Foxsat box that I’ve now installed in the bedroom works perfectly! so much for “upgrading” Any suggestions? . If I can’t sort this soon will returning it back to John Lewis!

      Quote

  58. admin Says:

    John said:
    Hi, I’m having trouble adjusting the picture format on Freesat chanel 401 (Racing Post live greyhound racing, the main reason for purchasing this box) & a fewothers, the picture is compressed making everything appear tall & thin. I find it unbearable to watch a distorted picture. Phoned Humax helpline they said try reducing the 1080 down to 720, did’nt work! The older Humax Foxsat box that I’ve now installed in the bedroom works perfectly! so much for “upgrading” Any suggestions? . If I can’t sort this soon will returning it back to John Lewis!

    If you have black bars on left/right, it may be just that the broadband for that particular programme or channel is in 4:3, which the receiver can’t override.

      Quote

  59. David Hewett Says:

    I posted this elsewhere but I think this may be the best place to ask this

    Just purchased a HUMAX Freesat HD Model HB 1000S to add to my Technisat HDFS

    Great picture Great interface Great Box Great Value

    However I will now attempt to purchase a USB HD that will work – From my past experience this does not always go well

    So I know it needs to be formatted NTFS although I expect the box takes what it finds and formats it the way HUMAX wants it.

    However my old Technisat had a Maximum partition of somewhere around 500 GB

    Now 1 and 2 TB USB drives are readily available great for mass archive so can you tell me – and make wider information on the best drives – Approved drives ? and considerations we should make when making a purchasing decision.

    Oh and I already established an external powered device is the one to go for – But others may buy usb powered disc drives – You could save customers buyers remorse if you at least published if this was the case with your box.

    THANKS for your attention

    David

      Quote

  60. K Moore Says:

    Any news on the playback functionallty of recorded programs from a networked HDR1000?

    Would be very interested in getting a multiroom setup with a master HDR1000 and a couple of hb1000′s when this comes available.Curious to the performance/restrictions of such a set up, i.e. Could two networked hb1000 watch two separate recordings simultaniously, or whilst the hdr1000 is recording? Could recordings be set up via the hb1000?

    Thanks

    KM

      Quote

  61. Angus Says:

    I am very impressed with the HB-1000s so far only have for me two major software functions flaws which should be by todays standard with all equipment of this type.

    The first is the inability to delete and control recordings (not about talking trying to make copies) apparently you have to wait for the hard drive to become full before you can decide what to keep or delete. There is mention of an action menu for recordings but so far I have been unable to find access to it.

    The second is the ability to hide any channels not just parent controlled adult channels. In the favourites it seems unable to sort in a user defined list.

    At present these are my only faults with what otherwise is a really good receiver.

    If any one has found a way around these issues I would appreciate the help.

    Many thanks

    Angus

      Quote

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